Managing Higher Education in Uncertain Economic Times

TIAA-CREF Institute Fellows Symposium
TIAA-CREF Headquarters
New York, New York

May 2008 |

In early May, 2008 the TIAA-CREF Institute brought together senior administrators in higher education, leading academic researchers on higher education issues, and the senior leadership of TIAA-CREF to examine means for continuing to fulfill the mission of higher education during uncertain economic times through strategic management of finances, operations, the workforce and key institutional relationships. The symposium featured presentations on issues such as reducing cost while improving quality, understanding and communicating price changes in higher education, strategic management of human resources, reforming delivery on the business side of higher education, endowment management in volatile financial markets and fundraising best practices in uncertain economic times.

The symposium featured presentations by:

Kathy Hagedorn, founder and president of The Hagedorn Institute, a management and human resources consulting firm, and retired Vice President for Human Resources at Saint Louis University, on strategic management of human resources.
Brett Hammond, Managing Director and Chief Investment Strategist, TIAA-CREF, on endowment management in volatile financial markets.
Alan Korthals, Director of Client Support, Kaspick & Company, on fundraising best practices in uncertain economic times.
James McGill, Senior Vice President for Finance and Administration, Johns Hopkins University, and TIAA-CREF Institute Fellow, on reforming delivery on the business side of higher education.
Risa Palm, Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs at the State University of New York, and TIAA-CREF Institute Fellow, on reducing cost while improving quality.
Clark Ross, Vice-President of Academic Affairs and Dean of Faculty at Davidson College, on understanding and communicating price changes in higher education.

A common thread running through the symposium’s discussions was that higher education must critically examine all aspects of its operations and even consider possibilities that in the past may have seemed heretical, such as moving away from the traditional classroom lecture model of delivering education, instituting fundamental changes in the business-operations and human resources areas at colleges and universities, and even turning down large donations if the conditions of the proposed gift are not consistent with the core mission of the institution.

A TIAA-CREF Institute Advancing Higher Education publication based on the symposium is available in the Institute research library.
 

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