2011 and 2012 Combined Traditional and Roth IRA Contribution Limits

Your Age Affects Your Deduction and Contribution Eligibility

If you are under 50 years of age at the end of the calendar year: You may be able to contribute up to $5,000 or 100% of your earned income, whichever is less, to a Traditional or Roth IRA in 2011 and 2012. The deductible portion of your Traditional IRA contribution as well as the maximum contribution that can be made to a Roth IRA may be reduced depending on your modified adjusted gross income (AGI). Your contributions can be split between a Traditional IRA and a Roth IRA, but the combined limit is $5,000.

If you are 50 years of age or older at the end of the calendar year: You may be able to contribute up to $6,000 or 100% of your earned income, whichever is less, to a Traditional or Roth IRA in 2011 and 2012. The deductible portion of your Traditional IRA contribution as well as the maximum contribution that can be made to a Roth IRA may be reduced depending on your modified adjusted gross income (AGI). Your contributions can be split between a Traditional IRA and a Roth IRA, but the combined limit is $6,000.

2011 Traditional IRA Deduction Limits

If you are covered by a retirement plan at work, use this table to determine if your modified AGI affects the amount of your deduction.

If Your Filing Status Is… And Your Modified AGI Is…   Then You Can Take…
single or
head of household
  • $56,000 or less
  • more than $56,000 but less than $66,000
  • $66,000 or more
 
  • a full deduction up to the amount of your contribution limit.
  • a partial deduction.
  • no deduction.
married filing jointly or qualifying widow(er)
  • $90,000 or less
  • more than $90,000 but less than $110,000
  • $110,000 or more
 
  • a full deduction up to the amount of your contribution limit.
  • a partial deduction.
  • no deduction.
married filing separately*
  • less than $10,000
  • $10,000 or more
 
  • a partial deduction.
  • no deduction.
*If you file separately and did not live with your spouse at any time during the year, your IRA deduction is determined under the "Single" filing status.

If you are not covered by a retirement plan at work, use this table to determine if your modified AGI affects the amount of your deduction.

If Your Filing Status Is…   And Your Modified AGI Is…   Then You Can Take…
single, head of household, or qualifying widow(er)   any amount   a full deduction up to the amount of your contribution limit.
married filing jointly or separately with a spouse who is not covered by a plan at work*   any amount   a full deduction up to the amount of your contribution limit.
married filing jointly with a spouse who is covered by a plan at work  
  • $169,000 or less
  • more than $169,000 but less than $179,000
  • $179,000 or more
 
  • a full deduction up to the amount of your contribution limit.
  • a partial deduction.
  • no deduction.
married filing separately with a spouse who is covered by a plan at work*  
  • less than $10,000
  • $10,000 or more
 
  • a partial deduction.
  • no deduction.
*If you file separately and did not live with your spouse at any time during the year, your IRA deduction is determined under the "Single" filing status.

 

2011 Roth IRA Contribution Limits

This table shows whether your contribution to a Roth IRA is affected by the amount of your modified AGI as computed for Roth IRA purpose.

If You Have Taxable Compensation and Your Filing Status Is…   And Your Modified AGI Is…   Then…
married filing jointly or qualifying widow(er)  
  • less than $169,000
  • at least $169,000 but less than $179,000
  • $179,000 or more
 
  • you can contribute up to the contribution limit.
  • the amount you can contribute is reduced.
  • you cannot contribute to a Roth IRA.
married filing separately and you lived with your spouse at any time during the year  
  • zero (-0-)
  • more than zero (-0-) but less than $10,000
  • $10,000 or more
 
  • you can contribute up to the contribution limit.
  • the amount you can contribute is reduced.
  • you cannot contribute to a Roth IRA.
single, head of household, or married filing separately and you did not live with your spouse at any time during the year  
  • less than $107,000
  • at least $107,000 but less than $122,000
  • $122,000 or more
 
  • you can contribute up to the contribution limit.
  • the amount you can contribute is reduced.
  • you cannot contribute to a Roth IRA.

 

2012 Traditional IRA Deduction Limits

If you are covered by a retirement plan at work, use this table to determine if your modified AGI affects the amount of your deduction.

If Your Filing Status Is… And Your Modified AGI Is…   Then You Can Take…
single or
head of household
  • $58,000 or less
  • more than $58,000 but less than $68,000
  • $68,000 or more
 
  • a full deduction up to the amount of your contribution limit.
  • a partial deduction.
  • no deduction.
married filing jointly or qualifying widow(er)
  • $92,000 or less
  • more than $92,000 but less than $112,000
  • $112,000 or more
 
  • a full deduction up to the amount of your contribution limit.
  • a partial deduction.
  • no deduction.
married filing separately*
  • less than $10,000
  • $10,000 or more
 
  • a partial deduction.
  • no deduction.
*If you file separately and did not live with your spouse at any time during the year, your IRA deduction is determined under the "Single" filing status.

If you are not covered by a retirement plan at work, use this table to determine if your modified AGI affects the amount of your deduction.

If Your Filing Status Is…   And Your Modified AGI Is…   Then You Can Take…
single, head of household, or qualifying widow(er)   any amount   a full deduction up to the amount of your contribution limit.
married filing jointly or separately with a spouse who is not covered by a plan at work*   any amount   a full deduction up to the amount of your contribution limit.
married filing jointly with a spouse who is covered by a plan at work  
  • $173,000 or less
  • more than $173,000 but less than $183,000
  • $183,000 or more
 
  • a full deduction up to the amount of your contribution limit.
  • a partial deduction.
  • no deduction.
married filing separately with a spouse who is covered by a plan at work*  
  • less than $10,000
  • $10,000 or more
 
  • a partial deduction.
  • no deduction.
*If you file separately and did not live with your spouse at any time during the year, your IRA deduction is determined under the "Single" filing status.

 

2012 Roth IRA Contribution Limits

This table shows whether your contribution to a Roth IRA is affected by the amount of your modified AGI as computed for Roth IRA purpose.

If You Have Taxable Compensation and Your Filing Status Is…   And Your Modified AGI Is…   Then…
married filing jointly or qualifying widow(er)  
  • less than $173,000
  • at least $173,000 but less than $183,000
  • $183,000 or more
 
  • you can contribute up to the contribution limit.
  • the amount you can contribute is reduced.
  • you cannot contribute to a Roth IRA.
married filing separately and you lived with your spouse at any time during the year  
  • zero (-0-)
  • more than zero (-0-) but less than $10,000
  • $10,000 or more
 
  • you can contribute up to the contribution limit.
  • the amount you can contribute is reduced.
  • you cannot contribute to a Roth IRA.
single, head of household, or married filing separately and you did not live with your spouse at any time during the year  
  • less than $110,000
  • at least $110,000 but less than $125,000
  • $125,000 or more
 
  • you can contribute up to the contribution limit.
  • the amount you can contribute is reduced.
  • you cannot contribute to a Roth IRA.

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